Using Text Files to Keep Organized

I recently came across this old article on using various text files to stay organized. In the past I have tried many ToDo apps with little success. So I have been using a slightly modified version mentioned in the article with great success. One big help is some quick and dirty aliases I added to my .bashrc file which are all kept in a directory called “daily”. You can name them as you wish. My next move is to put them in my ownCloud sync directory.

The .bashrc aliases:

#Daily txt files I write to for various reasons
alias todo='vim ~/Documents/daily/todo'
alias onething='vim ~/Documents/daily/one-thing/today_$(date +%Y%m%d)'
alias journal='vim ~/Documents/daily/journal/journal_$(date +%Y%m%d)'
alias writedaily='vim ~/Documents/daily/write-every-day'
alias ideas='vim ~/Documents/daily/ideas'
alias done='vim ~/Documents/daily/done'
alias actionplan='vim ~/Documents/daily/action-plan'

100 Days to Privacy Online: Day 14 – I2P Network

We have previously covered Tor which is perhaps the most popular decentralized overlay anonymity network (DarkNet) in the world.

Today we’ll cover I2P, which is a decentralized overlay network much like Tor in many ways. But with more features built into it.

From I2P site:

 

  • I2P is an anonymous overlay network – a network within a network. It is intended to protect communication from dragnet surveillance and monitoring by third parties such as ISPs.

  • I2P is used by many people who care about their privacy: activists, oppressed people, journalists and whistleblowers, as well as the average person.

I2P offers features like blogging, forums, email, anonymous sites and more. It is a younger project than Tor but has many promising advances and features when compared. It is a great addition to your privacy arsenal.

Get I2P Now

 

100 Days to Privacy Online: Day 13 – Tails

Towards the beginning of this series we covered Tor. Today we are covering Tails (The Amnesic Incognito Live System), a live operating system that can be run from USB stick, DVD, or SD card. It runs Tor and can be used to maintain maximum privacy since it routes all traffic through Tor.

What you’ll need:

Once you have a USB stick download and install Tails.

After you have installed Tails you want to plug it into your computer and reboot. Be sure to go into your BIOS and make USB your first boot device. Or (if applicable) hit the key to select boot order at startup.

When you have booted into Tails you will have the option to set an Administrative password by clicking Yes. This will allow you to install additional software and make system changes. For most users needs this will not be needed.

If you wish to save files encrypted to the USB drive you will need to enable persistence.

Download and Install Tails

Get Help Setting Up Tails

 

100 Days to Privacy Online: Day 12 – Bitmessage

Most people who use email know it is not very secure. It’s been compared to mailing someone a postcard. Meaning anyone who gets a hold of it can read it. Yesterday we covered using Mailvelope to encrypt emails using PGP. Today we discuss Bitmessage.

From Bitmessage site:

Bitmessage is a P2P communications protocol used to send encrypted messages to another person or to many subscribers. It is decentralized and trustless, meaning that you need-not inherently trust any entities like root certificate authorities. It uses strong authentication which means that the sender of a message cannot be spoofed, and it aims to hide “non-content” data, like the sender and receiver of messages, from passive eavesdroppers like those running warrantless wiretapping programs.

You can use Bitmessage for direct contact or use it for the equivalent of an email list that they call “channels”.

Download Bitmessage

Help Installing Bitmessage

100 Days to Privacy Online: Day 11 – Mailvelope for Encrypting Email

Mailvelope is a Firefox plugin to add PGP encryption to any webmail provider. PGP stand for Pretty Good Privacy and is a standard means of public key cryptography. This plugin allows you to use it without the need for using an email client.

You can also use Mailvelope to encrypt files.

When you visit a common webmail provider you will see the Mailvelope icon in the compose box:

This will open the Mailvelope editor to compose message in. The reason is to secure it from the email provider prior to encryption.

Add Mailvelope to Your Browser

Detailed Install and Usage Instructions